Exhausting! The building codes have limits.

Seems like this dryer vent is a “cut-and-dryer” case of what were they thimkin?!

As anyone that regularly reads my posts knows–I love standing seam metal roofs. Inspecting them is difficult if they are steep, but because a fair amount of skill is necessary to install them, they usually don’t have a lot of issues that are not going to be apparent from the eaves–assuming you can get to the eaves. I was able to get to the eaves at two locations on this duplex, and overall the roof looked great.

The pitch is 7/12–not an exactly friendly pitch for an asphalt roof–and certainly not for a steel roof. A slippery slide at the playground is not much steeper than this–some are less steep. Add to that, that it was raining at the time of inspection, guaranteed that I would not be venturing onto the roof. From the eave I did note one thing on this 5 year old home.

The dryer exhaust cap.

How is anyone going to do routine maintenance on this vent cap? While the installation meets code requirements, I still find the installation seriously lacking.

Even with the best filter/screens in dryers, these caps will eventually plug with lint. Cleaning at least a couple of times a year is typically necessary–but at least there was no screen in this cap like is so often the case.

The “close-up” of the cap shows a fair amount of lint building up inside the cap–who can tell whether the flap opens properly or not?

I have no clue as to a viable solution to this problem, when the dryer is not located on an outside wall of the home–but surely some solution is warranted. If no other route for the exhaust can be found, then establishing a maintenance program with someone trained and qualified to be on this type of roof a couple of times a year may be warranted.

Perhaps it is time to make an adjustment to the codes–and/or good sense.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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The futile business of cleaning gutters.

As long as people insist on not installing gutter-guard systems on their homes, the gutters will insist on regular maintenance—and even then will still require some maintenance.

So what does “regular maintenance” look like?  Certainly not like the following picture.

The amount of maintenance necessary will depend on lots of factors.  The types of vegetation present that will fill the gutters, how long it takes for this to happen and seasonal loading for some kinds of vegetation around the home—and of course kids and dogs.

Kids and Dogs?

It is amazing the kinds of stuff I find on roofs and in gutters related to either being tossed by kids or from things being tossed for dogs to chase.  Hopefully nobody really expected the dog to get up on the roof.  I was actually surprised in the picture above that the ball apparently did not float out of the way.

While some dams might be constructed of bricks they should not be used to dam up gutters.

In some cases cleaning might be required every month—for some homes once a year might be enough.  I know that if I had to clean mine every month I would be thinking really hard about installing a gutter guard system.

As you can see in the following pictures it does not take very much debris to completely dam up a gutter.

Overflowing gutters defeats the purpose of the gutters—which is to collect it, send it down the downspouts where it can be directed away from the foundation (either above ground or below ground).

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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Log homes and energy efficiency

On a recent road trip around the State of Washington, we stayed at a motel constructed of older style Pan Abode buildings built sometime in the late 50’s. 

The structures seemed in remarkably good condition for their age, but the stresses on these structures are perhaps not what they would be in a wetter area of the state–like west of the mountains–in the Seattle area.  The structures seemed well suited to their hot and dry climate.

What I found interesting was the insulating ability of the 4″ thick walls–or their lack of ability would perhaps be more accurate.

This first picture is of the exterior wall.  The red rectangle corresponds to an area at the interior that will be discussed below.

Pan-abode type building

This next picture is what the wall structure looks like.  You can see the double tongue and group shape with the wall being approximately 4″ thick.

Pan-abode type wall structure

On the interior, with thermal camera, the wall and pillow temperatures show in the next two pictures.

Thermal image Thermal image

In this next picture we see the wall with the pillows moved away from the wall to reveal how the wall was “insulated” by the pillows.  The wall, heated up by the direct sun shining on it at the exterior, could not give up its heat to the interior as readily as the other areas of the wall. Thermal imageThermal image

My understanding is that modern Pan Abode structures are a double-wall type of construction that allows for the installation of insulation inside the walls.  This would certainly be required by modern energy codes for both heating and cooling. 

Regardless, these pictures demonstrate very well how poor 4″ of wood is as insulation (about R-4).  By themselves, it would take exceptionally large logs to meet modern energy efficiency standards.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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