Do I invite the wolf in—or try to keep him out?

Do I invite the wolf in—or try to keep him out?

Everyone knows the story of the three pigs. From that story, we learned that we should all build our houses out of brick if we are to keep the wolfs at bay.

disintegrating brick columnOur houses have to deal with all kinds of wolfs. There are water-wolves, earthquake-wolves, tornado-wolves, wind-wolves and the dreaded lightening-wolves.

No matter what we build our houses out of, they all need to be maintained or the wolf WILL get in.

This house wasbuilt in 1902 and I discovered, much to my buyers chagrin, that the wolf was having his way with the brick foundation. Those pesky mortar-wolves were patiently eating away at the foundation. Almost anything after 116 years would likely show deterioration and certainly all three of the pigs are dead by now regardless of their choice of building materials. The brick foundation has done its job quite well considering the number of significant wolf-quakes it has stood up to.

But now it is likely beyond repair—or at least extensive repairs that would amount to a new foundation will be necessary. The mortar joints and bricks are crumbling and some beams are no longer supported at all.

Unsupported beam and collapsed brick

Unsupported beam and failed brick

Unsupported beam and failed brick

Unsupported beam and failed brick

Someone will have to make a decision as to whether to let the wolves have it—or to try and keep them at bay for a few more years.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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“Difficulty” is not on their radar!

OK, this is the question of the day.

Why would “anyone” deliberately dump a 5 gallon bucket of sawdust in a crawl space?

Carpenter Ant Frass

Carpenter Ant Frass

I see all sorts of things dumped and stored in crawl spaces. I have even seen sawdust from when the home was built, or from floor refinishing that has filtered down through the cracks in the floor boards–making neat parallel lines on the black vapor barrier covering the ground.

But this stuff was just piled–more or less in one location–along the foundation. It was nowhere near the access to the crawl space, so one might think it was difficult to get it to where it was as well.

But the “someone” that dumped the sawdust, I am quite sure, never contemplates “difficulty.”

carpenter ant frass

This is especially true when you realize this stuff got there ONE BITE AT A TIME!

Carpenter Ants make amazing carpenters–although they seem much better at taking things apart than putting things together.

These carpenters have been working on this home for quite some time and have piled up their construction debris as prove of their industriousness and patience.

“Difficulty” and “impatience” are something that they obviously do not consider.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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The Cat House & Home Inspection Protocol

 Just walking around a home–looking at it from a distance–I can often tell what might be in store for me on the interior.  Home inspectors will usually take this “macro-view” of the home prior to getting up close and personal with the “micro-view.”  It is a very important part of the home inspection protocol to utilize both of these views of the home–and all the spaces in between.

Crawl spaces

At a recent inspection, as I headed around the back side of the home, I took the following picture.

Cats in the crawl space

I suspected the home probably had a crawl space even though I was told it did not–supposedly built on a slab.

As I saw Kitty-Kitty sticking his head out of the crawl space hatch I knew what this meant–there was indeed a crawl space as I suspected.

Well it could have also meant that this was just the access well and that there was a door behind Kitty-Kitty and he was just hanging out in the access well.

But I knew what this meant.  There was in  fact no cover at all and the crawl space was where Kitty-Kitty lived.  The best I could hope for was that Kitty-Kitty had not turned the crawl space into a latrine and that he would be amenable to my checking out his digs.

As it turned out, not only was he amendable–so was his partner.

cats in the crawl space

Neither one even minded me snapping a few pictures–in fact one never even seemed to wake up.

I was also grateful that their digs was still a crawl space–instead of a litter-box.

Crawl spaces are perfect environments for cats.  They are dark, there is a high likelihood of mobile food, and they can do what cats do.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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