New construction home? Why not?

I inspected a very nice new construction home a while back–excellent builder, that obviously cares about the homes he builds.

I love new construction.

Let me put it a better way.

I LOVE NEW CONSTRUCTION.

Sure there can be issues, but if old and new homes consist of 1000 things that can go wrong, starting at anything less than 500 issues is way better than starting at 1000. Of course I am exaggerating in both extremes. The reality is most older homes are going to have more issues to deal with than a new home will. This new one was better than most new ones. In other words–there was not much to fix. If you think my analogy is wacky let me create a basic list of things to think about:

Grading,

Retaining walls,

Drainage,

Foundation,

Exterior cladding,

Decks,

Windows,

Framing,

Insulation,

Interior finishes,

Plumbing,

Appliances,

Heating/Cooling systems,

Energy efficiency,

Air sealing,

Wiring,

Roofing,

Chimneys,

In older homes, every single one of the things on this list can have issues of deal killer proportions–not to mention just normal everyday kinds of issues from leaky faucets to outdated finishes (unless someone has already spent the money to remedy them–and then of course the house will still have a marginal foundation, marginal framing–or whatever else that has not been upgraded).

Of course we have not even yet started to talk about lead, asbestos and buried oil tanks.

In a new home, how many of the things on that list are going to have issues of deal killer proportions?

I rest my case.

I am sure that most of the things I found wrong in this new home were things that were already on the builder’s own punch list. One thing that I found wrong was in the kitchen, when I turned on the gas range. This is what the burners looked like.

It looked more like what you want your gas fireplace to look like than what you want your range to look like. The problem is a simple one. Someone had not changed the orifices from natural gas to propane.

While I was doing the inspection there was a flurry of activity all around the home as workers rushed to get the place cleaned and detailed. Realistically I was about a week early–but the inspection had already been put off a couple of weeks and it had to be done.

By the time I finished the upstairs and came back downstairs, the appliance installer had changed out the orifices and now the flame looked better.

This meant that now I would not have to report on the defect, but would instead get to use it as blog fodder. So all was not lost.

Did I tell you how much I love new construction?

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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Comments

  1. Larry Keils says:

    Charlie,

    Ain’t it the truth. Always a good read serious or just humor.

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