Key West, Mountain View Home for Sale!

Everyone knows that new construction homes do not need a home inspection!

Why bother—what a waste of money. The jurisdictional inspectors have been all over the home like white on snow since day one. Plus, why would a builder with a good reputation, or any of the sub-contractors working for the builder, that is looking to maintain their good reputation and relationship with the builder, mess with their good reputation and relationships by doing less than professional work?

Of course if you believe this, I have some Mountain View property I will sell you in the Florida Keys.

Here is just one example of some of the many issues I found in a new construction home the other day. In the crawl space, the main plumbing drain makes a long run across the crawl space and has several metal hangers to support the pipe.

Disconnected pipe hangers

Disconnected pipe hangers

While the plumber likely installed the hangers properly initially, someone has come along later and disconnected two of the hangers leaving the pipe to sag and hold water (perhaps the insulation installers?). While not a difficult repair, it is just one example of why inspections on even new homes are important.

Here is a partial list of other issues on the new home:

1. Hot water to tub and shower fixtures above 146 degrees F.

2. B-vent above roof not tall enough

3. No bollard to protect water heater in garage

4. No flashings above window trim

5. Crawl space vents missing vent wells

6. Door bell not functional

7. Kitchen sink/countertop not caulked

8. Seams of 4-piece tub/shower unit not caulked

9. Heat at upper floor registers 30 degrees warmer than lower floor registers

10. Weather-stripping missing on crawl space access door

11. Garage/House door self-closure mechanism disabled

12. Gas fireplace not functional

13. Property address numbers incorrect on house

14. Concrete installed on top of siding

15. No clearances under faux stone at grade

15. No GFCI/AFCI protection at all required locations.

16. Deck ledgers installed on top of siding.

17. Skylights not attached.

18.  Missing roof/attic vents (holes open)

All of these items easily exceed the cost of the inspection and is by no means a complete list. While some will be relatively easy to fix and perhaps already on the builder’s punch list, others the builder will not address at all (like the one where water runs down hill).

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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New construction home? Why not?

I inspected a very nice new construction home a while back–excellent builder, that obviously cares about the homes he builds.

I love new construction.

Let me put it a better way.

I LOVE NEW CONSTRUCTION.

Sure there can be issues, but if old and new homes consist of 1000 things that can go wrong, starting at anything less than 500 issues is way better than starting at 1000. Of course I am exaggerating in both extremes. The reality is most older homes are going to have more issues to deal with than a new home will. This new one was better than most new ones. In other words–there was not much to fix. If you think my analogy is wacky let me create a basic list of things to think about:

Grading,

Retaining walls,

Drainage,

Foundation,

Exterior cladding,

Decks,

Windows,

Framing,

Insulation,

Interior finishes,

Plumbing,

Appliances,

Heating/Cooling systems,

Energy efficiency,

Air sealing,

Wiring,

Roofing,

Chimneys,

In older homes, every single one of the things on this list can have issues of deal killer proportions–not to mention just normal everyday kinds of issues from leaky faucets to outdated finishes (unless someone has already spent the money to remedy them–and then of course the house will still have a marginal foundation, marginal framing–or whatever else that has not been upgraded).

Of course we have not even yet started to talk about lead, asbestos and buried oil tanks.

In a new home, how many of the things on that list are going to have issues of deal killer proportions?

I rest my case.

I am sure that most of the things I found wrong in this new home were things that were already on the builder’s own punch list. One thing that I found wrong was in the kitchen, when I turned on the gas range. This is what the burners looked like.

It looked more like what you want your gas fireplace to look like than what you want your range to look like. The problem is a simple one. Someone had not changed the orifices from natural gas to propane.

While I was doing the inspection there was a flurry of activity all around the home as workers rushed to get the place cleaned and detailed. Realistically I was about a week early–but the inspection had already been put off a couple of weeks and it had to be done.

By the time I finished the upstairs and came back downstairs, the appliance installer had changed out the orifices and now the flame looked better.

This meant that now I would not have to report on the defect, but would instead get to use it as blog fodder. So all was not lost.

Did I tell you how much I love new construction?

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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Is it true that they don’t build houses like they used to?

It is common for Home Inspectors to whine about the problems with New Construction.  I have to say that for all the faults with these houses, they are almost “always” easier to inspect and result in shorter inspection reports than older homes of comparable size and the monies spent on them.

The Doctor's house at Fort Casey, Whidbey Island, WA

The Doctor’s house at Fort Casey, Whidbey Island, WA

I see some VERY nice new homes out there—-along with the new ones that are not so nice.

It is very easy to point to some beautiful old mansion—-or very well built older home—-and say, “They sure don’t build them like they used to.”  But if we take that 100 year old house with all its faults, and compare it to the cheaper houses built around that same period of time we realize that this nice house is the only one left standing—-there is nothing to compare it to. 

The crappy new houses of today are those same houses of yesterday that are no longer around—-except that they are still here.  It does not mean there are no great ones.  In 100 years, when all the crappy houses being built are no longer around, people will be looking at the houses of Bill Gates, Paul Allen, and millions of other homes that are not anywhere near as expensive as these, and they will be saying, “They sure don’t build them like they used to.”

But back to new construction and a recent inspection—-and I would put this home in the category of those homes that will likely be around in 100 years. 

I was up in the attic and discovered that the vent pipe from the Laundry Exhaust fan had become disconnected and had been turned into an “insulation blowing” machine.

Disconnected exhaust fan

Disconnected exhaust fan

Actually a pretty easy fix—-and one of only a few real defects that I found in the home.  It could have happened in a $150,000 tract home or a Carbon Billionaire’s $12,000,000 Green home.

They actually do still build them like they used to—-and better.

 

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

If you enjoyed this post, and would like to get notices of new posts to my blog, please subscribe via email in the little box to the right. I promise NO spamming of your email :-D