Grandfather gets grandfathered

Once-upon-a-time, grandpa was working on a junction box in the basement when he came in contact with the neutral of a multi-wire circuit for the dishwasher/disposal. He had shut the circuit down but because there was no handle tie–the neutral was still energized.

He got such a shock he fell off the ladder and broke his leg—already compromised by long term lead exposure.

There was no way he was going to make it up the stairs, so he thought if he could crawl to the basement bedroom he would be able to get out the window. However, the window was too high off the floor and way too small to fit through. It was not an option.

By now it was getting dark and he was beginning to panic.

The stairs loomed like a mountain in front of him, dark and ominous. There was no light switch to light up the stairs and he might not have been able to figure out a way to turn it on anyway. The missing handrail would also be of no help. So, he began the long painful slide up the stairs dragging his sorry leg behind him.

Fighting all the way, to avoid sliding back down the too steep stairs, he finally got to the top. That is when he realized he left his keys on the basement workbench. He remembered it being a bad idea when he set them down.

Without his keys he could not unlock the keyed deadbolt. It would have been excruciating to reach anyway, but after the stairs he figured he could have managed.

He thought about the back door but calling for help from there would have been useless. It had to be the front door.

He thought about the phone hanging on the kitchen wall 5 feet off the floor, but he had already ruled out being able to reach that.

He lay there listening to himself wheeze, mustering all the common sense he could.  He likely later would trade that for good sense instead.

He decided his only option was to break the very large plate glass panel next to the door to call for help.

He lifted the heavy cast iron Cherub door stop and smashed the glass with one painful blow. The non-safety-glass panel shattered into large guillotine shaped pieces that swooshed down slicing off poor grandpa’s hand.

He bled to death right there.

Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

Walkways and Bridges

While we all would love to have a moat around our castle, the walkways to today’s castles generally don’t have to be too concerned with how well they can deter invading marauders or emissaries from Game of Thrones.

If today’s castles can keep out an occasional crusading evangelist, political campaigner or vacuum cleaner salesman, that is all we can hope for.

I am sure some designer or architect spent considerable time designing the bridge to the front entryway of this castle–crossing over the carefully rock-lined artificial stream.

The Castle Road

But really…..is this acceptable for night time visitors to the home? How about a hoard of little trick-or-treaters? How easy would it be to take an inadvertent swim with the alligators from one slight miss-step?

I don’t even want to think about wheel chairs.

This might be a good example of the codes being a “minimum” standard. In the days of castles there might be armored guards to throw you in the moat. While not required by today’s standards, a barrier/guard would certainly be prudent on the path to this castle—or having a very good insurance policy.

Some designs are simply a lawsuit away from becoming the latest code change.

Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

On Your Guard

Your deck is 14” off the ground. You know it does not need a guard (barrier railing in lay terms). A guard is only required when the deck gets to be more than 30 from grade (plus some other rules that we are not going into right now).

The point is that you feel you want one anyway–after all, a fall from 14 inches in the dark with a beer in one hand and a girl in the other could still be at best embarrassing.

So you install a nice guard around the decks as you can see in the following pictures.

The problem is that once a guard is installed, even though it is not required, it must conform to the current requirements of a guard. The guard is not merely a thing installed to keep you from falling 30 inches. If that was the case, the spacing between the balusters or rails would not have to be so close together. The spacing is such that a small child will not either fall through or strangle themselves in the openings.

So even though this guard was not required the spacings between the rails on the one deck and the balusters on the other should be no greater than 4” per current standards.

Charles Buell, Real Estate Transactions in Seattle