Walkways and Bridges

While we all would love to have a moat around our castle, the walkways to today’s castles generally don’t have to be too concerned with how well they can deter invading marauders or emissaries from Game of Thrones.

If today’s castles can keep out an occasional crusading evangelist, political campaigner or vacuum cleaner salesman, that is all we can hope for.

I am sure some designer or architect spent considerable time designing the bridge to the front entryway of this castle–crossing over the carefully rock-lined artificial stream.

The Castle Road

But really…..is this acceptable for night time visitors to the home? How about a hoard of little trick-or-treaters? How easy would it be to take an inadvertent swim with the alligators from one slight miss-step?

I don’t even want to think about wheel chairs.

This might be a good example of the codes being a “minimum” standard. In the days of castles there might be armored guards to throw you in the moat. While not required by today’s standards, a barrier/guard would certainly be prudent on the path to this castle—or having a very good insurance policy.

Some designs are simply a lawsuit away from becoming the latest code change.

Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

On Your Guard

Your deck is 14” off the ground. You know it does not need a guard (barrier railing in lay terms). A guard is only required when the deck gets to be more than 30 from grade (plus some other rules that we are not going into right now).

The point is that you feel you want one anyway–after all, a fall from 14 inches in the dark with a beer in one hand and a girl in the other could still be at best embarrassing.

So you install a nice guard around the decks as you can see in the following pictures.

The problem is that once a guard is installed, even though it is not required, it must conform to the current requirements of a guard. The guard is not merely a thing installed to keep you from falling 30 inches. If that was the case, the spacing between the balusters or rails would not have to be so close together. The spacing is such that a small child will not either fall through or strangle themselves in the openings.

So even though this guard was not required the spacings between the rails on the one deck and the balusters on the other should be no greater than 4” per current standards.

Charles Buell, Real Estate Transactions in Seattle

What’s a little raw sewage between friends?

OK–nasty subject–I get that, but what is an inspector to do?

These sorts of issues are considered life/safety issues and the purpose of modern plumbing is to keep “stuff” where it belongs.  We like it when the drinking water stays in the pipes, the waste stuff stays in the pipes and the two don’t get mixed together.

ejectorpump1This sounds like a good plan.

I don’t like sewage ejector pumps–but they exist so I have to deal with them occasionally.  They are common whenever you have plumbing fixtures that cannot drain by gravity.  The effluent has to be pumped up to a level where it can drain by gravity.

Homeowner installation of these devices is almost always obvious and tragic.  At a recent inspection I found one in the basement of a home where a non-conforming kitchen and bathroom had been added.  The bathroom properly drained to the sump below the surface of the basement floor.

The kitchen sink drain however was tied into what amounted to the vent pipe for the unit (the lower pipe that runs off to the right).  However, because there was a big hole cut in the sump cover, no vent was really necessary for the pump to function.  The vent is there because under normal operation a vacuum would be created if it was not there.  A vacuum could suck the water out of the traps of the fixtures it was servicing.  The hole in the cover eliminates any possibility of there ever being a vacuum created.

There also has to be a check valve to prevent water that has been pumped out from draining back into the sump.  There also has to be a gate valve and unions so that the unit can be taken apart to be serviced.  Most importantly there HAS TO BE A SEALED LID!

ejectorpump2

Without a sealed lid the sewage could flood the basement if the pump were to fail–not to mention the likely continual odors of sewage that would be present.

I can only guess why anyone would destroy a perfectly good lid to create this health and safety issue.

The installation needs a new lid—but more importantly it needs a licensed plumber.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

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