You don’t know your “ape index?”

Do you have a positive or negative ape index?  I guess before you answer that question it might be a good idea to know what an ape index is–otherwise who knows where one’s mind might go.

If you are, or were, a sport climber you most likely would know what one is.  Stretch your arms out away from each other as far as you can.  If the length from finger tip to finger tip is “greater” than your height–you have a positive ape index.  If it is shorter than your height you have a negative ape index.  Most people’s have a negative ape index.

Climbers consider having a positive ape index beneficial for obvious reasons.  I was always amused by this concept because what could one do about it–bone stretching exercises?  Bring back the rack maybe?

Anyway, this post is about long reaches–and what you can do with a long reach–even for someone like me with a negative ape index.

This is a pet door in a garage door (although it could be the door to one’s home).

Pet door

Pet door

The door was locked and no one had a key so I just got down on the ground and reached through to the inside handle and un-locked it.  The buyer and agent were both shocked at not only how possible this was but that I could actually do it so easily.

apeindex2

All you need is an adequate ape index

I think this is good information for a buyer to know about whenever pet doors are installed in doors in homes.

While security of homes is never absolute–lets at least avoid and/or fix the obvious breaches.

 

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

 

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Doggondest stairs

I realize this is a REALLY nice deck and stairs–for Barney–but shouldn’t they have been thinking about him in his old age–when he might need a ramp, a guard, a handrail or a mat?
This is but one example of some of the strange things that people do for their pets.
In some instances these installations become rather easy points of entry for “others” besides the family dog.  Kicking in an opening like this is very easy, and if the doggie-door is in the house door, it is quite common to easily reach the locks on the inside from the doggie-door–much easier and quieter than breaking glass.
Of course dealing with Cujo once you have entered his trap is a whole nuther issue.

By Charles Buell, Real Estate Inspections in Seattle

 

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Pet Doors—what is the “real” cost?

People do indeed love their pets.

We spend billions of dollars annually on pets in this country (This “Pet Bailout” is somewhere near $50,000,000,000.00 a year).

pet door

Typical pet door cut into a garage door

One of the simple little things that is part of that number is pet doors installed in the door to the garage.  These simple little pet doors cost about $30.00—-perhaps another $30 bucks to get someone handy to install it—-unless of course it is on the “honey-do” list, which of course, as we all know, would then be “free of charge.”

What that initial cost won’t include is replacement of the door itself as soon as the first home inspector comes along.

Installing these things in the fire-resistant door between the house and the garage negates the fire-resistance of the door and thus the door would have to be replaced.  A new door (assuming the existing jambs and threshold can be re-used) would cost somewhere around $160.00.  Installation would likely require the services of someone that knows what they are doing (so NOT on the “honey-do” list)—-which might add another $160.00—perhaps more.  Now with some serious number crunching, we arrive at a new total cost of the pet door at $380.00—-at least.

Fortunately the house didn’t burn down and no one died—-so the adjusted cost is still within acceptable limits—-I guess.

So let’s get back to the $50,000,000,000.00 pet bailout.  Do we have to add all these extra “hidden costs” to the total?  Do we have to start adding to that number the costs of new carpeting throughout the home?  Replacement of other damaged fixed items in the home?  How about the damaged blinds or curtains, chewed moldings, scratched door jambs and ductwork full of pet hair?  There is also the re-grading/re-seeding the back yard where Rover got creative.

Well, we may not be up to the “infamous” $700,000,000,000.00 bailout—-but I think you can get the picture—pets are expensive and hard on a home.

***

Charles Buell, Seattle Home Inspector

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